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January 20, 2012 - Urban Growth of Montgomery, Alabama

Montgomery Alabama Before
Landsat 5
September 21, 1986
Montgomery Alabama After
Landsat 5
September 10, 2011
Montgomery Alabama Before
Montgomery Alabama After
September 21, 1986 September 10, 2011
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In the past 30 years the population of Montgomery, AL, has grown from just under 125,000 to over 200,000. The change in land use from forest and croplands to urban and industrial areas is evident in the Landsat images above. City officials use Landsat data to assess the changing land through the years. For more information, visit the Image of the Week section of the EROS Image Gallery.

January 13, 2012 - Postfire Regrowth in the Dominican Republic

Dominican Republic Before
Landsat 7
March 21, 2005
Dominican Republic Middle
Landsat 7
July 27, 2005
Dominican Republic After
Landsat 5
February 10, 2011
Dominican Republic Before
Dominican Republic After
March 21, 2005 February 10, 2011
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In March 2005, large fires burned rainforests in the Cordillera Central in the Dominican Republic. The fires started in José del Carmen Ramirez National Park, on the lower reaches of Pico Duarte, the country's highest mountain. The March 2005 Landsat image above shows the burned mountain slopes as dark brown, unburned forest as green, the hot fire fronts glow red, and the thick smoke appears blue. The dark green covering the fire scars in the February 2011 image indicates the regrowth of the forest lands. For more information, visit the Image of the Week section of the EROS Image Gallery.

January 6, 2012 - Rising Water Changes Caspian Sea Shoreline

Caspian Sea Shoreline Before
Landsat 5
August 21, 1985
Caspian Sea Shoreline After
Landsat 5
August 29, 2011
Caspian Sea Shoreline Before
Caspian Sea Shoreline After
August 21, 1985 August 29, 2011
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While Caspian Sea water levels have historically fluctuated, the area has seen increasing water volume in the past two decades. These Landsat images show a small portion of the Caspian Sea shoreline, in 1985 and again in 2011. The Volga River is the dominant source of water for this inland sea, and heavy rains have greatly enlarged the flow into the Sea in the past decades. For more information, please go to the Image of the Week section of the EROS Image Gallery.

December 28, 2011 - Arcadia Lake, Oklahoma

Arcadia Lake Before
Landsat 5
August 12, 1986
Arcadia Lake After
Landsat 5
August 1, 2011
Arcadia Lake Before
Arcadia Lake After
August 12, 1986 August 1, 2011
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Arcadia Lake, a reservoir located just east of Edmond, Oklahoma, was constructed in the 1980s as part of the National Flood Control Act of 1970. Arcadia Lake was created to control floods in the Deep Fork River Basin, supply water to the city of Edmond, and provide recreational resources to the surrounding communities. Landsat images show the area in 1986, before the earthen dam blocked the Deep Fork River, and in 2011, with the reservoir near capacity. For more information, visit the Image of the Week section of the EROS Image Gallery.

December 24, 2011 - The Dead Sea

Dead Sea Before
Landsat 5
November 9, 1984
Dead Sea After
Landsat 7
November 28, 2011
Dead Sea Before
Dead Sea After
November 9, 1984 November 28, 2011
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The Dead Sea is located in the Jordan Rift Valley and borders Jordan, Israel, and the West Bank. These Landsat images show the change in the Dead Sea from 1984 to 2011. In recent decades, diversion of water from the Jordan River, the sea's main tributary, has caused the Dead Sea to shrink. Mineral evaporation ponds that have replaced open water in the southern part of the sea can be seen in the 2011 image. For more information, visit the Image of the Week section of the EROS Image Gallery.

December 14, 2011 - The alluvial fans of the Mississippi River Delta Basin

Alluvial Fans of the Mississippi River
Landsat 5 Mosaic
October 3 and November 11, 2011
Alluvial Fans of the Mississippi River
October 3 and November 11, 2011
 

The Mississippi River drains over two-thirds of the conterminous United States, sending an enormous amount of water through the Mississippi River Delta Basin in southern Louisiana. The river's velocity slows upon reaching the Gulf, reducing its capacity to carry suspended mud and sand, depositing the sediment in vast alluvial fans as shown in the Landsat 5 mosaic above. The fan deposits are major sources of petroleum, natural gas, and sulfur. This image was created using four Landsat 5 scenes acquired October 3 and November 11.

November 30, 2011 - West Virginia surface mining

Surface Mining Before
Landsat 5
June 6, 1987
Surface Mining After
Landsat 5
June 8, 2011
Surface Mining Before
Surface Mining After
June 6, 1987 June 8, 2011
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Nearly half of the Nation's electrical power comes from coal burning; much of that coal comes from West Virginia. An increasing amount of coal extracted each year in West Virginal comes from surface and mountain top mining. The 1987 and 2011 Landsat satellite images above illustrate the expansion of surface mining in west central West Virginia. For more information, visit the EROS Image Gallery.

October 4, 2011 - Fires in the Savannah Grasslands of Australia's Northern Territory

Savannah Grassland Fires Before
Landsat 5
September 7, 2011
Savannah Grassland Fires After
Landsat 5
September 23, 2011
Savannah Grassland Fires Before
Savannah Grassland Fires After
September 7, 2011 September 23, 2011
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Australia's normally dry interior was covered in thick grass that, after drying over the winter months, turned into an abundant source of fuel for the large fires burning throughout Australia's Northern Territory. The 2011 fire season is considered one of the most extreme in recent years. An example of the recent burn damage can be seen in the comparison of the September 7 and September 23 Landsat 5 images above.

September 23, 2011 - Rain helps suppress Pagami Creek Fire, Minnesota

Pagami Creek Fire Before
Landsat 5
July 18, 2011
Pagami Creek Fire After
Landsat 7
September 19, 2011
Pagami Creek Fire Before
Pagami Creek Fire After
July 18, 2011 September 19, 2011
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Wet and cold weather is helping firefighters strengthen their grip on the Pagami Creek fire in the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northern Minnesota. Started by a lightning strike on August 18, the fire grew slowly and exploded into a major blaze September 11-12. Drawn from 28 states, firefighters continue to make steady progress against the fire. The September 19 Landsat 7 image above shows the nearly 94,000 acres burned.

September 16, 2011 - Pagami Creek fire, Minnesota

Pagami Creek Fire Before
Landsat 5
July 18, 2011
Pagami Creek Fire After
Landsat 7
September 12, 2011
Pagami Creek Fire Before
Pagami Creek Fire After
July 18, 2011 September 12, 2011
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Hundreds of campers were evacuated from the 1.1 million-acre Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness in northern Minnesota as the Pagami Creek fire continued to spread. Started by a lightning strike on August 18 about 14 miles east of Ely, Minnesota, the fire is the largest forest fire in Minnesota since 1918. The fire can be seen burning brightly in the September 12 Landsat 7 image above. Smoke from the fire has affected air quality as far away as Chicago.

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