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September 14, 2011 - Bastrop County Complex Fire (Texas)

Bastrop Country Fire Before
Landsat 5
August 26, 2011
Bastrop Country Fire After
Landsat 5
September 11, 2011
Bastrop Country Fire Before
Bastrop Country Fire After
August 26, 2011 September 11, 2011
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The Bastrop County Complex Fire, southeast of Austin, Texas, has consumed homes, agricultural land, and a state park. The distance from the northernmost part of the fire to the southernmost is more than 15 miles. The Landsat 5 images above show the area as it was on August 26 and the damage as of September 11. These images use mid-infrared and near-infrared bands in order to display burned vegetation clearly.

The "LUECKE" name that appears in the eastern portion of the image is a local man who left his name in trees for pilots to see as they come and go from the local airport (seen on the south edge of the image).

September 13, 2011 - Wildfires of Oregon

Oregon Wildfires Before
Landsat 5
July 23, 2011
Oregon Wildfires After
September 9, 2011
Landsat 5
Oregon Wildfires Before
Oregon Wildfires After
July 23, 2011 Landsat 5
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Multiple wildfires on the Warm Springs Reservation in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon can be seen in the Landsat 5 image acquired on September 9 (above). Started by a lightning storm on August 24, the freshly burned land appears as red, and vegetation is green.

September 2, 2011 - New York State's drowned lands

New York State's Drowned Lands Before
Landsat 5
July 30, 2011
New York State's Drowned Lands After
Landsat 5
August 31, 2011
New York State's Drowned Lands Before
New York State's Drowned Lands After
July 30, 2011 August 31, 2011
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The aftermath of Hurricane Irene, shown in the August 31 Landsat 5 image above, reveals the intense flooding in the black dirt region surrounding the hamlet of Pine Island in the town of Warwick, New York. Originally called "the drowned lands" the region is the remains of a great shallow lake which was formed by receding glaciers. Crops grown in the 5500 acres of the black dirt area include onions, lettuce, radishes, cabbage, carrots, corn, pumpkin, squash; extensive sod farms are also in the low lands.

August 11, 2011 - The Drought that Wouldn't Leave

Texas Drought Before
Landsat 5
June 18, 2010
Texas Drought After
Landsat 5
August 8, 2011
Texas Drought Before
Texas Drought After
June 18, 2010 August 8, 2011
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Declared as the most severe one-year drought in Texas history, the drought has turned Texas and parts of the Plains into a parched moonscape of cracked earth. Texas had less than an inch of rain statewide in July, and more than 90% of the state is in the two most extreme stages of drought. The Landsat 5 images above show San Angelo's O.C. Fisher Lake, a 5,440-acre lake, filled with water on June 18, 2010, and as a dry, cracked lake bed on August 8, 2011.

For more information on this story, please go to the USGS Newsroom.

August 2, 2011 - The Untamed River

Missouri River Before
Landsat 7
May 18, 2010
Missouri River After
Landsat 5
August 1, 2011
Missouri River Before
Missouri River After
May 18, 2010 August 1, 2011
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The untamed Missouri River continues to alter the landscape of the Missouri River Basin, as shown in the Landsat satellite imagery above of the river near Decatur, NE, and Onawa, IA. Available evidence from the flood zone indicates that as new channels and deep cuts through the valley lowlands are likely being gouged, the rich farmland and countless human constructs are being destroyed or washed away in the months-long flood. In both images, vegetation is green.

July 20, 2011 - Flooding along the Nebraska and Iowa border

Nebraska City Before
Landsat 5
May 5, 2011
Nebraska City After
Landsat 7
July 17, 2011
Nebraska City Before
Nebraska City After
May 5, 2011 July 17, 2011
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Flooding down the Missouri River continues as shown in the Landsat satellite imagery above of the Nebraska and Iowa border. Heavy rains and snowmelt have caused record flows. In both images, green represents vegetation.

July 15, 2011 - Flooding Continues Down the Missouri River

Missouri River Flooding Before
Landsat 5
April 29, 2011
Missouri River Flooding After
Landsat 7
July 10, 2011
Missouri River Flooding Before
Missouri River Flooding After
April 29, 2011 July 10, 2011
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Heavy rains and snowmelt have caused record flows in 2011 along the Missouri River and caused the river to remain above flood stage for months. These Landsat satellite images demonstrate the extent of the flooding in central Missouri. In both images, green represents vegetation, purple represents urban areas, and brown-red represents bare ground.

July 13, 2011 - Flooding in the Missouri River Basin

Missouri Basin Before
Landsat 7
May 18, 2011
Missouri Basin After
Landsat 7
July 8, 2011
Missouri Basin Before
Missouri Basin After
May 18, 2011 July 8, 2011
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Normally the Missouri River meanders through Sioux City IA, and Omaha, NE; however, that hasn’t been true this year. The Landsat 7 images above show the extent of river flooding as upstream runoff from snowmelt and rainfall continues to surge through the area. Runoff into the Missouri River Basin above Sioux City during June was the highest single runoff month since the Army Corps of Engineers began keeping detailed records in 1898. The river narrows in the cities because of protective levees. In both images, vegetation is green.

July 8, 2011 - Las Conchas Fire, New Mexico

Las Conchas Before
Landsat 5
June 24, 2011
Las Conchas After
Landsat 7
July 2, 2011
Las Conchas Before
Las Conchas After
June 24, 2011 July 2, 2011
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The Las Conchas Fire, New Mexico's largest wildfire in recorded history, has burned over 135,000 acres to date. The fire began on June 26 when an aspen tree was blown down by strong winds, falling on power lines. In these Landsat images, vegetation is green, and dark red represents the burned area.

July 8, 2011 - Honey Prairie Fire, Georgia

Honey Prairie Fire Before
Landsat 5
April 30, 2011
Honey Prairie Fire During
Landsat 5
June 6, 2011
Honey Prairie Fire After
Landsat 5
July 3, 2011
Honey Prairie Fire Before
Honey Prairie Fire After
April 30, 2011 July 3, 2011
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Started by lightning on April 30, the Honey Prairie Fire in southeastern Georgia, has burned over 291,000 acres in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. At this time, the refuge is closed and visitor activities have been suspended. Fire crews continue to control reburns and mop up hotspots. In these Landsat images, vegetation is green, and dark red represents the burned area.

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