2017 CEOS Chair Team Led by USGS EROS Given Unit Award for Excellence of Service

USGS EROS has received the Department of the Interior’s Unit Award for Excellence of Service for its leadership as the 2017 Committee on Earth Observation Satellites Chair Team.

USGS EROS has received the Department of the Interior’s Unit Award for Excellence of Service for its leadership as the 2017 Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) Chair Team.

The citation recognizes the team of Jenn Lacey, Steve Labahn, Eric Wood, Gene Fosnight, Tom Cecere, Karen Reiser, and Center Director Dr. Frank Kelly as having distinguished itself by providing what it called exemplary leadership for 60 international space agencies operating over 150 satellites in 2017.

EROS Work Called 'Critical' to Wildfire Mapping, Response

USGS geologists join county and state partners in California to assess the aftermath of the Montecito debris flow that struck in January 2018.

When a wildfire rages across the landscape, the danger seldom ends with a final fading ember.

Dennis Staley understands this. A research physical scientist with the USGS Landslide Hazards Program in Golden, CO, Staley tries to figure out where that danger lurks after the fire dies. Where are debris flows likely to start on charred mountainsides? How much rain would unleash a muddy slurry of water, soil, vegetation, and boulders down steep slopes? How large might such a potential debris flow be?

EROS Team Working on Finalizing Ground System Design and Integration Preparation

USGS EROS staff will spend the next five months finalizing the ground system design and preparing for integration of the Landsat 9 system after the mission earned high marks for its critical design from a Standing Review Board.

USGS EROS staff will spend the next five months finalizing the ground system design and preparing for integration of the Landsat 9 system after the mission earned high marks for its critical design from a Standing Review Board (SRB) that met April 17-20 at the Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

Loveland Selected for South Dakota Hall of Fame

Recently retired EROS Chief Scientist Tom Loveland has been selected for enshrinement in the South Dakota Hall of Fame

Recently retired EROS Chief Scientist Tom Loveland has been selected for enshrinement in the South Dakota Hall of Fame.

“I think it’s very cool,” Loveland said of learning that he is among 10 inductees who will be enshrined into the Hall of Fame on Sept. 7-8 in Chamberlain. SD. “Obviously, you never anticipate something like this happening to you. But it certainly is an honor I appreciate very much.”

Senay, EROS Helping to Solve Riddle of Water Use in Upper Klamath Basin

The spring-fed Wood River in the upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon.

In the upper Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon, USGS scientist Gabriel Senay and his colleagues at the Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center are working to help solve this vexing riddle:

When it comes to water, when does less really mean more?

Landsat Global Archive Consolidation Initiative Ingests 5 Millionth Scene

The Landsat Global Archive Consolidation initiative has retrieved and ingested its 5 millionth image since it began in 2010. The data came from the Riyadh Ground Station in Saudi Arabia and was acquired by Landsat 5 on April 16, 1989. It shows an area over Bahrain, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia.

An eight-year effort to repatriate millions of Landsat scenes locked away in ground station outposts around the world reached a milestone in March 2018 when the 5 millionth such scene was recently ingested and placed in the archive at EROS.

The data came from the Riyadh Ground Station in Saudi Arabia and was acquired by Landsat 5 on April 16, 1989. It shows an area over Bahrain, Qatar, and Saudi Arabia.

Free, Open Landsat Data Unleashed the Power of Remote Sensing a Decade Ago

This image of the Ross Archipelago near the McMurdo Station in Antarctica was acquired January 1, 2018, by Landsat 8, almost exactly a decade after USGS and NASA officials signed off on a Landsat Data Distribution Policy that made Landsat images free to the public.

In the old days, before 2008, a view of planet Earth from space often came at a cost.

Want a Multispectral Scanner digital image in 1979 from Landsat 2? That’s $200. A Thematic Mapper image from Landsat 5 in 1995? The commercial company EOSAT that was operating the Landsat system at the time needed $4,000 a scene to recoup its costs.

Landsat 9 Ground System Development Not Simply a Repeat of Landsat 8

A Landsat 9 Ground System Preliminary Design Review this March in Sioux Falls brought plenty of praise, but also issues for the L9 team to tackle as it moves forward.

It might seem at first blush that developing and building a ground system for the upcoming Landsat 9 mission would be less complicated than past missions, particularly since L9 is often characterized as a repeat of Landsat 8.

Far from it, say USGS EROS Landsat Development Manager Brian Sauer and USGS L9 Ground System Manager Steve Zahn.

New Landsat Multi-Satellite Operations Center Important on Many Levels

Landsat 7 mission operations are being transitioned into empty available space at the Goddard Space Flight Center. Once that move is complete, and once officials are confident they can operate Landsat 7 out of the new location, then work will begin on reconfiguring the current Landsat 7 MOC into a multi-satellite operations center.

The future of Landsat mission operations is unfolding these days on the Goddard Space Flight Center campus against a backdrop of hammers swinging and nails being driven.

With the General Dynamics Mission Systems (GDMS) field office in Seabrook, MD, working full bore to figure out as many commonalities between the Landsat 8 and Landsat 9 missions as possible, work is well under way on the shuffling required to bring those multiple missions together into one new architecture.

EROS Plays Major Role in Evolution of Lidar Technology and Applications

Ground-based lidar and conventional survey methodology were used to validate the 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) Harris Geiger Mode lidar collect against the South Dakota Capitol in Pierre, SD.

At 186,000 miles per second, speeding pulses of light can reveal a lot about Earth’s landscapes.

Like where previously undetected fault lines exist. Where ground surface is swelling and sinking around a bubbling volcanic cauldron. Where ancient burial mounds lay hidden deep beneath forest canopies.

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