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February 17, 2017 - Wildfires Ravage Central, South-Central Chile

Wildfires Ravage Central, South-Central Chile Before
Landsat 8
January 24, 2017
Wildfires Ravage Central, South-Central Chile After
Landsat 8
February 2, 2017
Wildfires Ravage Central, South-Central Chile Map
Wildfires Ravage Central, South-Central Chile Before
Wildfires Ravage Central, South-Central Chile After
January 24, 2017 February 2, 2017
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Wildfires fueled by dry conditions, high temperatures, and strong winds scorched central Chile at a level Chilean officials say they haven’t seen in decades. On January 24, Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) mosaics show the burned land primarily south of Empedrado, with blue smoke and orange flames visible from an active fire on the periphery of the scar. By February 2, the burn scar expanded to completely surround the city, and extends north all the way to and beyond the Maule River.

February 10, 2017 - January Rain, Snow Refills California Reservoirs

January Rain, Snow Refills California Reservoirs
Landsat 8
December 29, 2016
January Rain, Snow Refills California Reservoirs
Landsat 8
January 30, 2017
January Rain, Snow Refills California Reservoirs
January Rain, Snow Refills California Reservoirs
January Rain, Snow Refills California Reservoirs
December 29, 2016 January 30, 2017
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A decade of drought in California has eased after the first month of 2017 thanks to heavy rains and snow. For the first time in three years, the U.S. Drought Monitor reported in late January 2017 that not a single area in California is considered in “exceptional drought,” the most severe category, compared to about 40 percent of the state under the most severe designation a year ago. Landsat 8 shows the dramatic reversal in these false-color views of Lake Nacimiento and Lake San Antonio along the coast in central California. As of late 2016, Lake Nacimiento was only 22 percent full. Today, it is at 81 percent full. Similarly, Lake San Antonio had been emptied to critical levels to supply the Salinas Valley with groundwater, and at only 3 percent full, was closed to public use on July 1, 2015. As of February 1, 2017, it was 26 percent full.

February 3, 2017 - Argentina Flooding Has Major Impact on Soybean Production

Argentina Flooding Has Major Impact on Soybean Production
Landsat 8
January 2, 2015
Argentina Flooding Has Major Impact on Soybean Production
Landsat 8
January 23, 2017
Argentina Flooding Has Major Impact on Soybean Production
Argentina Flooding Has Major Impact on Soybean Production
Argentina Flooding Has Major Impact on Soybean Production
January 2, 2015 January 23, 2017
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Heavy rains in late December 2016 and early January 2017 are affecting soybean production in Argentina’s bread-basket provinces, as well as soy prices worldwide. While rainfall is common in northeastern Argentina from December through February each year, the major flooding of soybean fields is easily recognizable in the January 2017 Landsat 8 image, compared to a Landsat image from almost exactly two years earlier. With almost 4 million acres of Argentina soybeans affected by the flooding, soybean and soymeal prices hit six-month highs in mid-January on the Chicago Board of Trade.

January 17, 2017 - Wildfires Scorch Pampas Region of Argentina

Wildfires Scorch Pampas Region of Argentina
Landsat 8
December 22, 2016
Wildfires Scorch Pampas Region of Argentina
Landsat 8
January 7, 2017
Wildfires Scorch Pampas Region of Argentina
Wildfires Scorch Pampas Region of Argentina
Wildfires Scorch Pampas Region of Argentina
December 22, 2016 January 7, 2017
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Since mid-December 2016, roughly two dozen wildfires in the Pampas region of Argentina have consumed almost 2.5 million acres while unleashing giant plumes of dense smoke. Likely caused by thunderstorms that followed a stretch of severe drought, the first fires started southwest of the city of Bahía Blanca. A Landsat 8 scene on December 22, 2016, shows smaller red burn scars from those initial blazes—an area of approximately 100,000 acres. Despite rain in the final days of December, a handful of hot spots persisted, and the fires spread. When it passed overhead on January 7, 2017, Landsat 8 captured dramatic imagery of large red burn scars across the landscape.

January 4, 2017 - Rare Snow Falls at the Edge of Sahara Desert

Rare Snow Falls at the Edge of Sahara Desert
Landsat 7
December 19, 2016
Rare Snow Falls at the Edge of Sahara Desert
Landsat 8
December 27, 2016
Rare Snow Falls at the Edge of Sahara Desert
Rare Snow Falls at the Edge of Sahara Desert
Rare Snow Falls at the Edge of Sahara Desert
December 19, 2016 December 27, 2016
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In mid-December 2016, a rarity occurred on the edge of the Sahara Desert in northwest Africa. It snowed. Landsat 7’s Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) sensor captured the image that shows the white covering on the caramel-colored landscape southwest of the Algerian community of Ain Sefra. All the snow except that at the highest elevations melted soon after, a fact Landsat 8 confirmed when it passed overhead on December 27. Ain Sefra’s last snowfall occurred on February 18, 1979.

October 21, 2016 - Hurricane Matthew Exacts Heavy Toll on Haiti

Hurricane Matthew Exacts Heavy Toll on Haiti
Landsat 8
September 26, 2016
Hurricane Matthew Exacts Heavy Toll on Haiti
Landsat 8
October 12, 2016
Hurricane Matthew Exacts Heavy Toll on Haiti
Hurricane Matthew Exacts Heavy Toll on Haiti
Hurricane Matthew Exacts Heavy Toll on Haiti
September 26, 2016 October 12, 2016
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A week after Hurricane Matthew slammed through southwestern Haiti on October 4, 2016, Landsat 8’s Operational Land Imager sensor provided dramatic documentation of destruction in the Caribbean country. Data acquired on September 26 shows the landscape green with vegetation. On October 12, eight days after the storm, the hillsides are denuded after the Category 4 storm dropped up to 30 inches of rain, washing away crops and fallows. Also evident in the post-storm image is a surge of sediment in the coastal waters at the mouth of the Ravine du Sud River near the seaport town of Les Cayes. Geologists say the sediment likely comes from slopes that lacked protective tree cover.

August 22, 2016 - Landsat Shows Spread of Soberanes Fire

Landsat Shows Spread of Soberanes Fire
Landsat 8
July 13, 2016
Landsat Shows Spread of Soberanes Fire
Landsat 8
August 14, 2016
Landsat Shows Spread of Soberanes Fire
Landsat Shows Spread of Soberanes Fire
Landsat Shows Spread of Soberanes Fire
July 13, 2016 August 14, 2016
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A wildfire near Soberanes Creek by Big Sur along coastal California started July 22, 2016, and spread to over 86,000 acres one month later. California Department of Forest and Fire Protection officials say the blaze began after an illegal campfire in a state park was abandoned. By mid-August, the fire had destroyed 57 homes and was threatening 410 more structures. Landsat 8 images from July 13 and August 14 show its dramatic progression as active fire burns orange in the scene, and smoke appears as a blue haze.

August 9, 2016 - Landsat Reveals Scar of ‘Good Burn’ at Guadalupe Mountains

Landsat Reveals Scar of ‘Good Burn’ at Guadalupe Mountains
Landsat 8
May 6, 2016
Landsat Reveals Scar of ‘Good Burn’ at Guadalupe Mountains
Landsat 8
June 23, 2016
Landsat Reveals Scar of ‘Good Burn’ at Guadalupe Mountains
Landsat Reveals Scar of ‘Good Burn’ at Guadalupe Mountains
Landsat Reveals Scar of ‘Good Burn’ at Guadalupe Mountains
May 6, 2016 June 23, 2016
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Wildfires in wilderness areas like Guadalupe Mountains National Park in west Texas are a danger, but can produce what land managers call a “good burn,” too. The Coyote Fire, which burned from May 7, 2016, through June 17, is a prime example of that. Pre- and post-fire images from Landsat 8 show a significant, 14,442-acre burn scar that emerged bright red within the park’s high country. Lightning started the wildfire, and strong winds drove it to the Texas-New Mexico border. As many as 300 firefighters worked to keep the blaze from encroaching on private lands or reaching park structures, while officials decided to let portions of the fire simply burn. Areas of the densely wooded park hadn’t burned in almost a century. Unharnessed, the Coyote Fire consumed dead wood and saplings that could have fueled future catastrophic blazes.

July 12, 2016 - Landsat, ASTER Work Together on Russian Wildfires

Landsat, ASTER Work Together on Russian Wildfires
Terra ASTER
June 29, 2016
Landsat, ASTER Work Together on Russian Wildfires
Landsat 8
June 30, 2016
Landsat, ASTER Work Together on Russian Wildfires
Landsat, ASTER Work Together on Russian Wildfires
Landsat, ASTER Work Together on Russian Wildfires
June 29, 2016 June 30, 2016
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Remotely sensed imagery of wildfires burning in the Siberia region of Russia shows the complementary possibilities of Landsat 8 and NASA’s ASTER sensor aboard its Terra satellite. Lightning triggered dozens of forest fires in remote Siberia in late June 2016, burning as much as 7,400 acres, according to Russia’s TASS news agency. Imagery acquired from Terra ASTER on June 29 shows smoke billowing from a small and a large fire, as well as some older burn scars. A day later, when Landsat 8 passed overhead, there was almost no smoke coming from the smaller fire, and a more pronounced scar. Vegetation appears red in the false-color imagery because near infrared (NIR) spectral bands used by both sensors are sensitive to vegetation greenness and were placed in the red position of Red-Green-Blue (RGB) composite images. Burn scars appear a dark brown to black with this band combination.

June 6, 2016 - Lake Mead near Las Vegas Reaches Historic Low

Lake Mead near Las Vegas Reaches Historic Low Before
Landsat 5
May 15, 1984
Lake Mead near Las Vegas Reaches Historic Low After
Landsat 8
May 23, 2016
Lake Mead near Las Vegas Reaches Historic Low Map
Lake Mead near Las Vegas Reaches Historic Low Before
Lake Mead near Las Vegas Reaches Historic Low After
May 15, 1984 May 23, 2016
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The surface level of Lake Mead in Nevada and Arizona has fallen to a historic low as 16 years of ongoing drought in the American Southwest continue to impact the Colorado River Basin. Landsat imagery captures the shrinking of the country’s largest reservoir. In a May 1984 Landsat 5 acquisition, Lake Mead is near its capacity of 1,220 feet above sea level. But 32 years later, in May 2016, Landsat 8 data show the reservoir at what NASA says is 37 percent full.

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