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A megacity is a region that has a population greater than 10 million. It seems the term was created for cities like Shanghai, China. In 2000, the fast-growing city was home to 16.4 million people. Shanghai’s population exceeded 24 million in 2023. It’s the 2nd largest city in China and 7th largest in the world.

Shanghai sits on the Yangtze River delta along China’s eastern coast. Much of Shanghai’s growth has been in suburban and outlying districts. The Landsat imagery makes this clear as the smaller populated areas outside of Shanghai expand and then are absorbed by the urban expansion. Growth is also notable along transportation systems. Landsat data provides insight into urban planning and sustainable development.

Imagery

Every picture has a story to tell
Apr. 23, 1984, Landsat 5 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Aug. 11, 1989, Landsat 5 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Aug. 12, 1995, Landsat 5 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Sept. 18, 2000, Landsat 7 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
July 19, 2004, Landsat 5 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Sept. 19, 2009, Landsat 5 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Nov. 4, 2014, Landsat 8 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Aug. 24, 2017, Landsat 8 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
July 29, 2019, Landsat 8 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Apr. 29, 2021, Landsat 8 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Apr. 8, 2022, Landsat 9 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China
Apr. 27, 2023, Landsat 9 (path/row 118/38,39) — Shanghai, China

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References

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