Main Content

The maximum depth of this large lake is only 40 feet. The entire surface freezes all the way across each winter, with ice reaching 2–4 feet thick.

That’s thick enough to drive cars and pickups on. According to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, clear ice 16 inches thick can support a heavy-duty pickup.

Some years look a little busier. In some images, the lake looks smudgy with snow or wind. So the view depends on local conditions on the day of Landsat overpass.

Imagery

Every picture has a story to tell
Jan. 9, 2001, Landsat 5 (path/row 28/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Feb. 5, 2005, Landsat 5 (path/row 28/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Jan. 24, 2009, Landsat 5 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Jan. 11, 2010, Landsat 5 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Jan. 17, 2018, Landsat 8 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Jan. 20, 2019, Landsat 8 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Feb. 24, 2020, Landsat 8 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Feb. 10, 2021, Landsat 8 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Jan. 20, 2022, Landsat 9 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA
Feb. 8, 2023, Landsat 9 (path/row 27/28) — southeastern Mille Lacs Lake, Minnesota, USA

Correlated

Additional story information
Downloads

Other Stories

Related imagery and additional content