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Cutoffs are common on meandering rivers like the Wabash, but it’s rare to be able to witness a cutoff forming as it happens. Scientists are using this cutoff as a chance to learn more about what happens when these cutoffs develop and how cutoffs change after they form.

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June 9, 2007, Landsat 5 (path/row 22/34) — Before the June 2008 flood
June 11, 2008, Landsat 5 (path/row 22/34) — During the June 2008 flood
July 13, 2008, Landsat 5 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
June 30, 2009, Landsat 5 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 4, 2010, Landsat 5 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
June 4, 2011, Landsat 5 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
June 14, 2012, Landsat 7 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 28, 2013, Landsat 8 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 15, 2014, Landsat 8 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Oct. 13, 2015, Landsat 7 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Sep. 5, 2016, Landsat 8 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Sep. 8, 2017, Landsat 8 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 2, 2018, Landsat 7 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 29, 2019, Landsat 8 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 23, 2020, Landsat 7 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 2, 2021, Landsat 8 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 13, 2022, Landsat 9 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA
Aug. 16, 2023, Landsat 9 (path/row 22/34) — New cutoff on the Wabash River, USA

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