OSM

The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) remote sensing program provides OSMRE offices, states, and Tribes with the necessary tools to use remote sensing technologies to support Titles IV (Abandoned Mine Lands) and V (Regulation of Current Mining) of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA).   As part of this support, the OSM remote sensing program provides high-resolution satellite imagery, aerial photography, and light imaging and detection (lidar) data to conduct analysis of terrain, vegetation, and hydrologic function on active mine sites to ensure reclamation is consistent with the approved mining permit.  These data are also used to support inventory, monitoring, and assessment of abandoned mine land features to ensure there is no threat to the environment or to health and human safety.

Bureau Full Name
Office of Surface Mining

2013 DOI Remote Sensing Activities

Remotely sensed data and derived information contribute significantly to mission-critical work across the Department of the Interior (DOI).  This report from the DOI Remote Sensing Working Group (DOIRSWG) highlights a sample of DOI remote sensing applications and illustrates the many types of technology, platforms, and specialized sensors employed.* DOI personnel use remote sensing technology to evaluate and monitor changing land-surface and natural resource conditions over the vast areas for which DOI has responsibility.

2014 DOI Remote Sensing Activities

Remotely sensed data and derived information contribute significantly to mission-critical work across the Department of the Interior (DOI). This report from the DOI Remote Sensing Working Group (DOIRSWG) highlights a sample of DOI remote sensing applications and illustrates the many types of technology, platforms, and specialized sensors employed.* DOI personnel use remote sensing technology to evaluate and monitor changing land-surface and natural resource conditions over the vast areas for which DOI has responsibility.

2015 DOI Remote Sensing Activities

Remotely sensed data and derived information contribute significantly to mission-critical work across the Department of the Interior (DOI). This report from the DOI Remote Sensing Working Group (DOIRSWG) highlights a sample of DOI remote sensing applications and illustrates the many types of technology, platforms, and specialized sensors employed.* DOI personnel use remote sensing technology to evaluate and monitor changing land-surface and natural resource conditions over the vast areas for which DOI has responsibility.

Kayenta Mine Terrestrial Lidar Collection

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/30/2018 - 14:12

OSMRE is using a RIEGL terrestrial lidar scanner to collect highly detailed elevation data for documenting restoration activities on the landscape. The RIEGL unit is mounted onto a tripod and emits several laser pulses per second and records when each of the pulses returns to the scanner.  A Digital Single-Lens Reflex (DSLR) camera is mounted on top of the scanner; after each scan, the camera obtains photos of the area scanned.

OSMRE Tests the 3DR Solo UAS for SMCRA Applications

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/30/2018 - 14:12

OSMRE has been piloting the use of drone vehicles since 2011 to document and monitor reclamation activities. Applied remote sensing is a priority for the OSMRE Appalachian Region and the use of drones adds value to time spent in the field by aiding in inspections, technical assistance, and increasing the use of remote sensing.  The OSMRE Appalachian Region Technical Support Division conducted a demonstration flight of the Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) equipment to staff in the Mid-Continent Regional Office and members of the Indiana Prime Farmland Team.

Satellite-Based Detection of Underground Coal Mine Fires

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/30/2018 - 14:12

Underground coal mine fires are widespread and pose a threat to both human and environmental health that can result in large economic loss, but they are generally underreported. Traditional mapping and monitoring of coal fires within the United States has primarily relied on costly field-based or airborne data, which are time and labor-intensive.  The OSMRE is investigating the use of remotely sensed satellite data to identify problematic coal fires.

Underground Coal Fires in New Mexico

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/30/2018 - 14:12

Underground coal fires can burn for years, and are a serious health and environmental hazard. There are four underground coal fires in northern New Mexico: two in close proximity to Gallup, one north of Farmington, and one south of Raton. The New Mexico Abandoned Mine Land Program (NMAMLP) has contracted several coal fire assessments to assist with the development of mitigation/extinguishment plans for these fires.

Use of an Unmanned Aircraft System for Stream and Coal Waste Reclamation

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/30/2018 - 14:12

The State of New Mexico Abandoned Mine Land Program (NMAMLP) is exploring remote sensing techniques to monitor change in land cover and stream morphology at reclamation projects.  The Program, as well as its reclamation projects, is funded through grants from the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement (OSMRE) based on the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA). Unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) promise high resolution imagery, flexible deployment, and relatively low cost at focused areas.

Remote Sensing Support for Active Coal Mining Inspections in the Mid-Continent Region

Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Mon, 07/30/2018 - 14:12

The OSMRE Alton Field Division (AFD) inspectors have been working with Kamiliah Lograsso, a physical scientist in the OSMRE Mid-Continent Regional (MCR) office Program Technology Support Branch (PTSB), to incorporate geospatial technologies into field inspections.  High-resolution imagery is used to evaluate sites before a field inspection. Some examples include confirming that there is no disturbance outside of a permit boundary or locating areas of potential acid mine drainage, among many others.